How about reducing spending in NY state

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion There was an interesting article on Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the Democrats plotting to blunt the new federal tax law impact.  Maybe instead of, as Gov. Cuomo stated, “redesigning our tax code to get out of the federal tax trap that they set,” the governor and his minions can look at reducing the spending in the state. For starters he can make the New York taxes a percentage of the federal taxes. This could go a long way in reducing the size of the tax department. But then again, the governor probably wants to keep our state as one of the top-taxed states in the country rather than be in a position to attract businesses and grow the economy.Jim VincentNiskayuna More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusNiskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

Report more about defense in lacrosse

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion When will the sports reporters and news anchors venture down the field to capture and highlight the defensive players during high school lacrosse games? Why can’t we capitalize on the lacrosse defense players? Their grind is to defend and that’s exactly what they do.When will the reporting be turned to the attention of the sporting fans’ offense and defense? The defensive fans are waiting to hear news reports about the moves, hits and defensive plays, ultimately winning the game.All of us high school lacrosse fans watch and enjoy the entire game, not just the offensive side. What will it take for the reporters to report on the whole team?It starts at defense. We know defense wins the game. The highlights from the defensive end aren’t being reported. Why?Faith CuillaScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

Io closes in on target for new industrial fund

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Beating the retreat from the Valley

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Midlands’ shed development battle goes to public inquiry

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Manchester take-up dips

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The Rugby Club

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Latin America cuts Europe travel links over virus fears

first_img“This decision has been taken regionally, so there will be no flights to our continent from Europe,” Edgar Melgarejo, president of Paraguay’s National Directorate of Civil Aeronautics, told reporters.The Peruvian government also suspended flights from Asia.Latin America’s biggest airline, the Chilean-Brazilian carrier Latam, said it was canceling 30 percent of its international flights for a two-month period due to falling demand over the coronavirus crisis.The measure will mainly affect flights from South America to Europe and the United States between April 1 and May 30, the company said.Argentina’s government suspended international flights from the worst affected countries, without stipulating which ones, for 30 days and declared a year-long health emergency.Last Saturday, Argentina was the first Latin American country to announce a death and has had 31 cases.Six Central American states and the Dominican Republic agreed Thursday to formulate a regional contingency plan to complement national efforts to deal with the coronavirus. The region has more than 50 cases, most of them in Costa Rica and Panama. “Countries must prepare their health services, because there will not just be one or two cases,” PAHO epidemiologist Marcos Espinal told AFP.Though still low in terms of global figures, the number of cases in Latin America grew steadily to reach more than 250 in 15 countries, with three deaths.The latest came in Guyana, where a 52-year-old local woman died. She had tested positive shortly after arriving from the United States last week.Following Venezuela and Bolivia, Paraguay and Peru became the latest countries to suspend flights from Europe, where Italy’s death toll from the virus soared past 1,000. Football matches suspended Other measures announced by Duque included suspending prison visits and banning cruise ships landing at the popular ports of Cartagena and Santa Marta.PAHO said it was sending support missions to countries with the weakest health services — Haiti, Venezuela, Honduras and Paraguay. “But everyone has to do their part — governments, civil society, citizens — because it is a multisectoral effort,” Espinal told AFP.Worst hit of the stock markets was Sao Paulo which plunged almost 15 percent by the close. Argentina fell almost 10 percent with Colombia down more than nine percent, Santiago losing over six percent and Mexico 5.3 percent.The Mexican peso closed at 21.64 to the US dollar, its lowest level since January 2017.Sport hasn’t been spared with world football governing body FIFA calling off two rounds of South American qualifying matches for the 2022 World Cup due to be played at the end of the month.Regional governing body CONMEBOL also suspended the next round of Copa Libertadores matches to be played next week.The Bahamas government said it had decided to withdraw from hosting the 50th General Assembly of the Organization of American States in June. Latin American states preparing for the onslaught of the new coronavirus on Thursday tightened restrictions on travel links to Europe as the region recorded its third death in the outbreak.Fears over the pandemic swept through Latin American markets, continuing a global rout that began in Asia early Thursday and forced the region’s biggest carrier to slash flights.The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) warned governments to get ready to cope with the pandemic.center_img ‘Health emergency’ As well as the travel restrictions, Bolivia’s interim President Jeanine Anez announced the closure of school and university classes.”I am making an appeal to Bolivians for calm,” Anez told reporters.Mexico’s private Tecnologico de Monterrey, with 150,000 students and 30,000 staff in several states, said it would suspend classes next week and resume them online later in the month.Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro said there were no confirmed cases in his crisis-worn country, but said large public gatherings and concerts were now prohibited.”We have to take gradually escalating measures,” he said after announcing the suspension of all flights from Europe for a month.Maduro also halted flights from neighboring Colombia, where President Ivan Duque declared a “health emergency” to help health services respond faster to the unfolding crisis.Socialist leader Maduro said Venezuela was considering closing its borders with Colombia and Brazil but called for “coordination” with the right-wing governments of Duque and Jair Bolsonaro, both of which have branded him a dictator.Maduro’s challenger for power, Juan Guaido, said the pandemic obliged him to reconsider calling his supporters into the streets — a tactic he has used in his so far unsuccessful bid that began last year to force Maduro from power.But he added in a Twitter video: “The fight for democracy is not suspended.”Brazil’s Bolsonaro, who has previously tried to downplay the virus outbreak, has been tested for the disease, his son Eduardo revealed on Thursday.Bolsonaro’s communications chief, Fabio Wajngarten, tested positive for COVID-19 after a trip to the United States last weekend.Duque also banned gatherings of more than 500 people in the country, which has nine confirmed cases of the coronavirus disease. 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South Korea to pay families hundreds of dollars to ease coronavirus impact

first_img“Citizens suffered from the coronavirus and they all deserve to be rewarded for their pain and participation in preventive efforts,” Moon told the meeting in comments broadcast on television.”There is a need for the government to reserve as much financial power to brace for an economic shock with no end in sight and promptly respond to labor market insecurity and any potential corporate liquidity crisis.”The new package is the latest in a recent series of steps the government has taken to ease the pressure on Asia’s fourth-largest economy.Finance Minister Hong Nam-ki said the government would have to issue deficit-covering bonds to at least partially fund the second budget. Previous measures have included an interest rate cut, a 11.7 trillion won ($9.54 billion) supplementary budget, raising a cap on currency forward positions for banks and a rescue package for companies totaling 100 trillion won ($81.6 billion).South Korea has largely managed to control the epidemic and drawn worldwide praise for its testing. Its daily number of new infections has been hovering at up to 100 for the past three weeks. Authorities have tightened border checks as the number of imported cases has risen.The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) reported 78 new cases on Monday, at least 13 of whom were people who arrived from abroad, most of them South Koreans.The national tally stood at 9,661, while the death toll rose by six to 158. The KCDC said 195 more people had recovered from the virus, bring the total of 5,228.Of the new cases, at least 10 were linked to a church in western Seoul, while a hospital in the hard-hit city of Daegu saw more than 75 infections over the past few days.South Korea announced on Sunday that all overseas arrivals would have to undergo two weeks of mandatory quarantine starting on April 1.Breaking the rules is punishable by a year in prison or a fine of up to 10 million won ($8,160). Topics :center_img South Korea will make emergency cash payments to all but the richest families and draw up a second supplementary budget next month in a bid to ease the drawn-out economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak, President Moon Jae-in said on Monday.Moon, after an emergency meeting with economic policymakers, said an “emergency disaster relief payment” of up to 1 million won (US$820) would be made to all households except the top 30% by income, totaling some 9.1 trillion won ($7.44 billion).Officials said they would prepare another extra budget worth 7.1 trillion won ($5.80 billion) for parliamentary approval in April and some small- and medium-sized companies would be exempt from paying utility bills starting this month.last_img read more

NasDem insists on deliberating omnibus bills to prepare for COVID-19 aftermath

first_imgThe NasDem Party, which is part of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s government coalition, has called on the House of Representatives to begin deliberating the omnibus bills on job creation and taxation. Responding to Saan’s statement, she said the House would focus on emergency measures for COVID-19 at this time.Read also: House members propose pay cut for lawmakers to finance COVID-19 aid“We will deliberate the omnibus bill later, according to standard procedure.”Experts see Puan’s reluctance as being driven by her desire to maintain her and the party’s image in the years leading up to the 2024 presidential electionCoalitions of civil society organizations, major labor unions and student organizations had prepared street rallies for mid-March to protest against articles in the omnibus bill on job creation that if passed would reportedly harm labor rights, the environment and democracy.There have also been objections to the bill’s less-than-transparent drafting process.The NasDem Party and Golkar, another party in Jokowi’s coalition, have been major supporters of the bill. Both actively sought support from other political factions at the House to deliberate the bill quickly to meet Jokowi’s 100-day deliberation target, including opposition parties, namely the Democratic Party, the National Mandate Party (PAN) and the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS).Several organizations have called on the House not to deliberate the bill amid the pandemic, citing limited public participation in the current situation. Speaking at the House’s plenary meeting on Monday, Lawmaker Saan Mustopa of the NasDem Party claimed the bills were needed to mitigate the economic impacts of COVID-19.“We need to prepare for [economic] recovery […] We should start deliberating the omnibus bills on job creation and taxation to prepare for the post-outbreak situation. We need to recover quickly,” he said at the House building in Senayan, Central Jakarta.The House, led by speaker Puan Maharani, who is from Jokowi’s Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P), is still reluctant to process the bill. Of the six political parties in the government coalition, the PDI-P has been the only one to urge lawmakers not to rush, citing public objections to the billPuan, daughter of PDI-P chairwoman Megawati Soekarnoputri, previously suggested that deliberations might begin in the current period, which started on Monday.center_img Topics :last_img read more