Category: gvlmellw

Peace Region Businesses win at ThriveNorth Business Challenge

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Peace region businesses cleaned up at the annual ThriveNorth Business Challenge held Thursday night in Fort St. John.ThriveNorth was launched in Northeast B.C. back in February. Managed by Futurpreneur Canada, the organization helps budding young entrepreneurs start and grow their businesses with mentorship, funding, and resources.The Business Challenge held at the Lido Theatre had three categories: Best New Business by an entrepreneur aged 18-28, Best New Business by an entrepreneur aged 29-39, and Best Growth Opportunity for an entrepreneur aged 18-39 whose business at least one year old. In the category of Best New Business for 18 to 28 year-olds was Holly-Anne Ritchie & Shay Bergunder with BowTie.  In the Best New Business for 29 to 39 year-olds the winner was Stephen Beard of Beard’s Brewing Company.Jessie Taylor from Mama G’s Country Kitchen in Chetwynd won in the Best Growth Opportunity.Each business was given $10,000 to fund their business.There was also a People’s Choice Award valued at $5,000, which was voted on by people at the Lido Theatre and online.  The winner of that award was Axel Whalen with Tiny Life Supply.last_img read more

New UNESCO panel seeks to identify how to bolster tolerance worldwide

4 February 2010The head of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has set up an expert group to find ways to increase tolerance around the world, as part of her commitment to promoting a “new humanism” to pursue a rapprochement of cultures. The head of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has set up an expert group to find ways to increase tolerance around the world, as part of her commitment to promoting a “new humanism” to pursue a rapprochement of cultures.The world, said Director-General Irina Bokova, is marked by a growing interdependence, but mistrust has also arisen in recent years.“I am convinced that UNESCO has all the strengths needed to provide a humanist response to globalization and crisis,” she said. “In response to the sense of vulnerability which permeates all levels, there is indeed a need to invent new forms of action to safeguard social cohesion and preserve peace.”The new panel will meet for the first time on 18 February in Paris. The gathering will also mark the launch of the International Year for the Rapprochement of Cultures, which will kick off with a round-table discussion on the theme, “The Dialogue of Cultures: New Avenues for Peace.”“The objective of this International Year is to help dissipate any confusion stemming from ignorance, prejudice and exclusion that create tension, insecurity, violence and conflict,” Ms. Bokova emphasized.The task, she said, will be to promote mutual knowledge and to generate respect for other cultures.“Exchange and dialogue between cultures are the best tools for building peace,” the UNESCO chief said. read more

Trump marks Apollo 11 anniversary by meeting its astronauts

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is marking the 50th anniversary of the first human steps on the moon with a meeting Friday with former Apollo 11 astronauts .The White House says Buzz Aldrin, Mike Collins and the family of mission commander Neil Armstrong will be greeted by Trump in the Oval Office. Armstrong, who died in 2012, and Aldrin made history when they landed on the moon 50 years ago Saturday, as Collins orbited overhead in their command module.Vice-President Mike Pence is set to mark the anniversary Saturday with a visit and speech at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.The Associated Press read more

AsiaPacific nations adopt platform for UN summit on sustainable development

The document, which was approved after three days of meetings and negotiations involving nearly 500 government and civil society representatives, will contribute to preparations for the World Summit on Sustainable Development to be held in Johannesburg, South Africa, in September 2002.In its assessment of the implementation of Agenda 21 — the blueprint for sustainable development adopted at the landmark UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 — the Phnom Penh platform states that while significant achievements have been made in many sectors, the environment continues to deteriorate and the number of poor in the region continues to increase.The statement highlights several critical environmental issues for the region, such as land and biodiversity, oceans and coastal resources, freshwater resources and atmosphere and climate change. On the economic and social front it points to chronic and persistent poverty, the impacts of globalization, sustainable energy development, human settlements development, unsustainable consumption and production and natural disasters as key areas of concern.To address these issues, the platform underscores the need for policy and institutional reform and identifies follow-up actions to achieve international development goals developed through the UN. It also outlines several regional initiatives, including those aimed at poverty reduction, cleaner production and sustainable energy, land management and biodiversity conservation, and sustainable development of small island states. To encourage greater financing for sustainable development in the region the platform emphasizes the need for strengthening the Global Environment Facility as well as the use of economic instruments and strategic alliances with civil society, in the framework of a “new global partnership.”The meeting was organized by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the UN Development Programme (UNDP), the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP) and the UN Environment Programme (UNEP). read more

Toxic waste from pesticides is ticking time bomb for poor countries UN

“Affected countries are calling – ever more frequently and with greater urgency – for assistance to remove their obsolete pesticide stocks and prevent the further accumulation of toxic waste,” Mark Davis, head of FAO’s programme on the Prevention and Disposal of Obsolete Pesticides, told an expert consultation in Rome.”Unfortunately, without additional funds from donor countries, FAO will be unable to respond to its member nations that need assistance because funding for an FAO programme on the prevention and disposal of obsolete pesticides is ending by the end of this year,” he said.These wastes are posing a continuing and worsening threat to people and the environment in Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America. Obsolete stocks in 53 African countries are put at 50,000 tons. In Europe, it is estimated that Ukraine has 19,500 tons of ageing chemicals, the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia 10,000 tons, Poland 15,000 tons and Moldova 6,600 tons. Stocks in Asia are currently recorded at 6,000 tons, a figure which does not include China, where the problem is believed to be widespread. In the Middle East and Latin America around 10,000 tons have been declared. Waste sites contain some of the most dangerous insecticides like the Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) aldrin, chlordane, DDT, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlor and organophosphates.Stockpiles have accumulated because some products have been banned for health or environmental reasons, but were never properly discarded. These stocks often deteriorate to contaminate the environment and put people at risk. The worst affected are frequently poor rural communities that may not even be aware of the toxic nature of the chemicals in their environment. “Clean-up and prevention measures urgently need to be combined,” Mr. Davis said. “The awareness of a targeted and limited use of pesticides, respecting human health and the environment, needs to be urgently raised in many countries.”The clean-up of one ton of obsolete pesticide waste costs around $3,500. Most developing countries do not have the facilities for safe hazardous waste disposal. read more

UN rights expert calls for independent probe into Saddam trial lawyers murder

A United Nations human rights expert today has called on the Iraqi Government to launch an independent investigation into the recent assassination of two lawyers involved in the trial of Saddam Hussein, saying he was concerned at allegations that the Interior Ministry might have been involved.“An independent investigation is essential because these killings have huge implications for efforts to establish the rule of law in Iraq,” the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions of the UN Commission on Human Rights, Philip Alston, said.He said the information he has received provides no clear evidence of the Ministry’s involvement but also no grounds for excluding that possibility.“When allegations call into question the impartiality of the Government, and when so much hinges on the facts, an independent investigation is the only way to uphold the rule of law,” he added. “This is clearly a situation in which a failure to undertake a convincing investigation will have major negative implications for all that the Government is trying to achieve.”Sadoum al-Janabi and Adel Muhammad al-Zubaidi represented defendants at the Iraqi Supreme Criminal Tribunal charged with crimes against humanity. Mr. Al-Janabi was found with two bullet wounds to the head after being abducted from his office by armed men on 20 October, the day after the trial began. Mr. Al-Zubaidi was killed on 8 November in a drive-by shooting that also injured another defence lawyer, Thamer al-Khuzaie. “When defence lawyers are murdered, the rule of law is doubly at stake,” Mr. Alston said he said. “Human rights law requires that all murders be investigated in a credible manner. Moreover, defence attorneys are critical to a fair trial, and their systematic assassination threatens the entire process.”Special Rapporteurs are unpaid experts serving in an independent personal capacity who receive their mandate from the UN Commission on Human Rights and report back to it. read more

Hospitals will supply free tampons and sanitary towels to inpatients following doctors

Hospitals will be ordered to supply free tampons and sanitary towels to patients, following a campaign by doctors.Medics had said it was unfair that some hospitals would provide men with razors and shaving foam but not offer women sanitary products.It follows research showing that four in ten NHS trusts did not provide the products to those in need, or would only provide limited emergency supplies.The British Medical Association (BMA) wrote to health officials a month ago, urging them to change the policy.They said towels and tampons are a basic human need – like food – and should be made freely available at all hospitals in the UK.Some patients cannot afford to buy their own products, while others unexpectedly find themselves in hospital with nobody to rely on, campaigners said.Simon Stevens, the head of the NHS will announce that from July, hospitals will be obliged to provide women with sanitary products.Freedom of Information disclosures from 187 NHS trusts and health boards found that 42 per cent of them did not supply sanitary products at all, or would only provide them in an emergency, or in small amounts.For those that did have a supply, tampons and towels were often only available on gynaecology or maternity wards.Only 22 per cent of hospitals said they could easily be bought on site by the patient.Among trusts that did purchase supplies, average spend was just 71p per bed per year.Estimates suggest UK hospitals could supply the products for around £120,000 per year.Mr Stevens said NHS trusts will be obliged to provide free tampons and other sanitary products to all girls and women who need them, under the standard contract with hospitals for 2019-20.The announcement was welcomed by charity Freedom4Girls, which campaigns against period poverty.Mr Stevens, chief executive of NHS England, said: “It is absolutely right that everyone has access to the essentials of daily life during their time in hospital, and that should include sanitary products.“It’s fundamental that we give patients the best experience possible during what can be a stressful time of their life, and by providing sanitary products the NHS can prevent unnecessary embarrassment and leave people to focus on their recovery.”Dame Parveen Kumar, chairman of the BMA’s Board of Science, said: “The BMA is delighted that NHS England has supported our call for sanitary products to be made freely available for patients, across England from July this year.“Since being raised as a concern by doctors in June last year, the BMA has undertaken extensive research into the poor provision of sanitary products in hospitals, including Freedom of Information requests to all English hospital Trusts.”This showed how patchy or non-existent the provision was and also the relatively small cost of providing tampons and pads free of charge.”We are pleased that our work, since then, with NHS England has culminated in such a successful result for women, bringing an end to indignity on top of ill-health.”She said the NHS was showing it could “lead by example”.“As well being an important influence in the shift that is necessary towards ending period poverty, this will be a relief  for many patients who will no longer face the embarrassment and stress of not being able to freely and easily access sanitary pads and tampons,” she said.Freedom4Girls founder Tina Leslie said: “This is a great initiative and is a fantastic step forward. NHS England have stepped up to the mark and been proactive in ensuring that hospital patients get tampons and sanitary towels.“It is also breaking down barriers and reducing the stigma around periods. When women go into hospital it can be a worry to know what to do if you start your period, but now that worry is taken away as they know they will be catered for.”The new requirement will mean women and girls receiving treatment in hospitals and other health settings will be able to request pads, pantyliners and tampons when they need them.Officials said the move would offer reassurance to anyone needing urgent care unexpectedly, the move also will help those who are in hospital long term, including mental health inpatients.Ruth May, England’s chief nurse, said: “Periods are part of life and too often we take it for granted that everyone has easy access to sanitary products.“Period poverty affects an estimated one in 10 girls in this country and it can cause real anxiety when you can’t find the right product when you need it.“Health problems are stressful enough, and this move will mean that the embarrassment, discomfort and anxiety finding yourself in hospital without adequate protection on your period will be a thing of the past,” she said.A recent survey showed that at least one in four women and girls has had to miss work or school due to not being able to afford sanitary products. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Over 20 killed in multiple suicide bombings and attacks in Afghanistan

first_imgOver 20 killed in multiple suicide bombings and attacks in Afghanistan The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack. Saturday 24 Feb 2018, 11:59 AM 2 Comments Security forces inspect in an explosion site in Lashkar Gah Image: Massoud Hossaini Image: Massoud Hossaini AT LEAST 23 people were killed and more than a dozen wounded in multiple suicide bombings and attacks in Afghanistan, officials said, the latest in a series of assaults in the war-torn country.In the biggest attack, Taliban militants stormed an army base in the western province of Farah overnight, killing at least 18 soldiers.“Last night a big group of militants attacked an army base in Bala Buluk district of Farah. Unfortunately, we lost 18 soldiers, two soldiers were wounded. We have sent more reinforcements to the area,” defence ministry spokesman Daulat Wazir said.The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack. Deputy provincial governor Younus Rasooli said the authorities had sent a fact-finding delegation to Bala Buluk to investigate the assault.In another attack, a suicide bomber detonated his explosives near the diplomatic area of Kabul during the morning rush hour, killing at least three people and wounding five others, deputy interior ministry spokesman Nasrat Rahimi told AFP.“At around 8:30 am, a suicide bomber on foot, well-dressed with a necktie on, was identified at a checkpoint. He blew up his explosives, killing three and wounding five others,” he said, updating an earlier toll.A security source who requested not to be named said the explosion happened near a compound belonging to the National Directorate of Security (NDS), the Afghan intelligence agency. The NDS compound is located near the NATO headquarters and the US embassy.“I was driving nearby when I heard a big explosion, the windows of my car were smashed. I saw several wounded people on the street near me,” a witness told Tolonews TV adding that security forces had since swarmed the area, closing off the main road leading to the attack site.In December, a suicide attacker on foot blew himself up near the same compound, killing at least six civilians.There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the latest attack in Kabul, which in recent months has become one of the deadliest places in Afghanistan for civilians.Since mid-January, militants have stormed a luxury hotel, bombed a crowded street and raided a military compound in the capital, killing more than 130 people as the city remains on high alert fearing further violence.Car bombings Source: Xinhua News Agency/PA ImagesIn two other attacks in volatile southern Helmand province, suicide car bombs killed at least two soldiers and wounded more than a dozen others, officials said.In the first incident, militants used a Humvee to attack an army base in Nad Ali district but the vehicle was destroyed when soldiers identified it and hit it with a rocket propelled grenade, provincial spokesman Omar Zawak told AFP.“Unfortunately, two soldiers were killed in the attack and seven wounded,” he said.The Nad Ali attack was followed by a second suicide car bombing in the provincial capital Lashkar Gah that wounded seven people.The attack was against an NDS compound and near a police headquarters in the city, Helmand police spokesman Salaam Afghan told AFP.The Taliban claimed both attacks in Helmand.Militants including the Taliban and the Islamic State group have stepped up their attacks on beleaguered Afghan troops and police in recent months, sapping morale already hit by desertions and corruption.Afghan soldiers have taken what the UN describes as “shocking” casualties since international forces ended their combat role at the end of 2014, though troop casualty figures are no longer released.© – AFP 2018Read: Explainer: Why UK Brexiteers have been told to ‘sod off’ away from the Good Friday Agreement > Feb 24th 2018, 11:59 AM https://jrnl.ie/3869776 center_img By AFP Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Short URL Security forces inspect in an explosion site in Lashkar Gah 3,630 Views Share Tweet Email last_img read more

Vancouver Public Schools weighing February run at levy

first_imgVancouver Public Schools appears unlikely this year to take advantage of changes to state law that would allow it to run an additional property tax levy, despite concerns over a multimillion-dollar budget deficit.At a recent work session, the Vancouver Public Schools Board of Directors tentatively laid out a plan to ask voters next February to approve a supplemental levy of no more than 51 cents per $1,000 in assessed property value, collecting as much as $11.75 million annually. The district plans to conduct a community survey prior to running the levy.The Legislature this past session raised the cap on local school levies from $1.50 to $2.50 per $1,000 in assessed property value, or at a level that would raise $2,500 per pupil, whichever leads to lower levy rates. It’s continued fallout from the McCleary decision, the landmark school funding lawsuit that determined the state was failing to fund basic education. Although the state Supreme Court ruled last year that the Legislature succeeded in meeting its constitutional duty to fully fund public schools, districts across the state are grappling this year with deficits in the millions of dollars.Vancouver Public Schools has scaled back its original $16.8 million in projected spending cuts to $8 million, due in large part to about $6.5 million in additional, one-time state money. The district made staff cuts to compensate for declining enrollment. The district’s general fund budget is about $324 million.The district is also spending $3.75 million from its reserve fund. Even so, the district is cutting more than $4 million in expenses. That includes 5 percent cuts in its central office for $1.2 million in savings, a 15 percent reduction in central office administrative positions for an $800,000 savings, and cutting travel for professional development in half, for a $400,000 savings. Teaching and counseling positions above adjusting for declining enrollment, meanwhile, were taken off the table for cuts this year.last_img read more

Govt accused of deceiving public in private airport deal three call for

first_img Recommended for you Related Items:crwon land, dr. edward smith, Fbo, gilbert selver, M aviation, provo air center, rev. courtney missick, turks and caicos airport authority Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Smith says he is no troublemaker, prepared to run in 2016 Elections Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 20 Aug 2015 – Two radio talk show hosts and a businessman are calling for transparency and accountability and charging that the UK Interim Administration intentionally deceived Turks and Caicos Islanders when it came to dispersion of Crown Land. The issue is linked to the already controversial M Aviation FBO, which sits adjacent the Providenciales International Airport and which has spawned a law suit and similar accusations from Lyndon Gardiner and his Provo Air Center. Rev Courtney Missick, Dr. Edward Smith and Gilbert Selver say the Crown Land should never have been given to the indigenous people and that in turn those indigenous people should never have given the land to M Aviation which operates Blue Heron Aviation. Rev. Missick: “The government deceived, along with the Airports Authority, deceive the people of this country to believe that we needed to obtain this land that is on the south side of the airport for the future expansion of the airport not knowing that they were taking this land from private citizens to give to M Aviation for them to be able to get their project off the ground.”The case in this matter has been submitted to court but was dismissed, but this group believes it a grave wrong to the future of aviation growth in the TCI. Dr. Edward Smith: “The deceit does not really stop there, because documents were actually prepared well in advanced that once this acquisition of these lands would have taken place as a matter of rubber stamping six and seven documents transferring this land from the people, to the Airports Authority from the Airports Authority to M Aviation and then onto the owners of the FBO, all in a matter of two days Turks and Caicos; something is wrong there.”The men want the case to be heard in a court of law and the trio vows to communicate with the British to bring the matter to the forefront. Selver explained that he is prepared to re-apply for the case to be heard. Gilbert Selver: “I have no interest in Mr. Gardiner’s business, no interest in Shawn’s Business, no interest in the Airports Authority business – the interest is in the Turks and Caicos Islands business that is why I say I will take it up, if it can be opened with a new citizen coming forward I will take it up because I can take a lot of bumps and bruises.” Dr Smith with PDA in Cheshire Hall, again Smith says PPP is deadlast_img read more

Gold near 7week high as traders see delay in US rate hike

first_imgGold was trading near its highest in seven weeks on Monday, bolstered by expectations the Federal Reserve will not hike U.S. interest rates soon.FUNDAMENTALS* Spot gold was little changed at $1,156 an ounce by 0043 GMT, after gaining 1.6 percent in the previous session.* The metal climbed to $1,159.80 on Friday, its highest since Aug. 28, after minutes from the Fed’s September policy meet showed that the central bank was deeply cautious about tightening monetary policy.* Weakness in the dollar, which fell to a three-week low on Friday, also helped support gold. [USD/]* A delayed rate rise could support non-interest-paying gold, although uncertainty over the timing could weigh on prices in the near term.* Two influential Fed policymakers on Friday reinforced Fed Chair Janet Yellen’s message that a rate hike is coming by year’s end.* Fed policymakers are still likely to raise rates this year but that is “an expectation, not a commitment”, and could change if the global economy pushes the U.S. economy further off course, Fed Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer said over the weekend.* Recent weak U.S. data and concerns over the global economy have prompted many to believe the first U.S. rate hike in nearly a decade will not come this year.* Hedge funds and money managers raised their bullish bets in COMEX gold and silver to four-month highs in the week ended Oct. 6, data on Friday showed, amid expectations the Fed will delay a much-anticipated rate hike.* Elsewhere, the London Bullion Market Association said on Friday it has formally asked exchanges and technology firms to bid for services such as a gold exchange or a clearing platform to make the London market more transparent and liquid.* South Africa’s Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union voted on Sunday to strike at the operations of AngloGold Ashanti, Harmony Gold and Sibanye Gold.* Among other precious metals, platinum eased 0.2 percent to $976.99, but wasn’t too far from a three-week high of $983 reached in the previous session.* Palladium was down 0.4 percent on Monday after climbing to a near-four-month high of $722 on Friday.* Trading activity during Asian hours is likely to be thinner than usual with Japanese markets closed for a public holiday. U.S. markets will also be shut on Monday for a holiday.last_img read more

Pranjal Salechas Journey Of Being A Blogger Is All About Do What

first_imgBlogging has become one of the most sorted professions today. Gone are the days when one had to be conscious about looks and physique to be a blogger. A true example of it is Pranjal Salecha. She is a fashion, travel and lifestyle blogger who has completed her fashion designing from Pune. Later, she started working as a wedding planner and a freelance designer. While working, she simultaneously started her blog for the love of styling. After getting an overwhelming response on her blog, she left her job and became a full-time blogger.Her Instagram handle, ‘thegulabigirl’ tends to focus more on the posts of fashion and lifestyle. Talking about her username, she said, “I have always been obsessed with pink and I am a bit desi at heart, so I wanted to have a fusion touch to it. I believe that my blog name should completely relate to me and that’s how Pink became Gulabi.”Having an experience of more than two and a half years, she recalls her phase of struggle. She had always been a reserved kid who was confused to take blogging as her career. One thing which irked her was that one must fit in the criteria of a model to become a blogger. Initially her parents were not happy with her decision of being a blogger and for several months she kept it a secret that she had decided to be a blogger. But later, when the response was good to her blog, her parents were convinced with it and today they are proud of their daughter.Sharing her experience about travelling, she believes that travel makes her explore more things about herself. Not just this, it also helps her understand different cultures about different countries which she incorporates in her styling. She has travelled the countries like Netherlands, Czech Republic, France, Singapore, Thailand and Mauritius to name a few. When asked about her choice for luxury brands, she revealed that her heart beats for street shopping. She believes that the old and colourful bazaars are a wonderful experience as one can explore different streets of different cities.IBT does not endorse any of the above content.last_img read more

All food and all play

first_imgFood should always be an experience. And after when we finally got to Benihana (Epicuria, Nehru Place) after days of planning it, those guys took it the ‘ninja’ level (for the want of a better word).We were seated at one end of their community tables (ones that can seat about eight; they also have private tables for four), sharing it with other two diners who sat on the other. With the hot plate open right in the middle of the table – the stage was set. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’While the starters we ordered arrived at the table, our chef for the night – Jonathan took over the table. The main ingredient to an incredible time in Benihana is the ‘dinner show’. We call it so because it is no less than a crazy magical act that ends with you tucking in some very, very good food.All your main orders get cooked right in front of your eyes – on the table. Right from the vegetables to the rice (or noodles), the meat and the fish – Chef Jonathan whipped up a storm as we watched fascinated. With the crazy knife tricks to chopping all up at breathless speed and livening everything up with his non-stop conversation and jokes, our chef had us watching it all fascinated. Another great thing of being able to see your food get cooked in front of you is the fact that you can tell the chef exactly how you want it – and he will ask. So while my friend wanted her lamb medium rare, I wanted it well done – so there we had it, made as we wanted – on the table. Ask the chef to up the spice or keep it mild – your call, your food. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIt is mad fun and there isn’t a single dull moment in the restaurant as diners keep walking in, joining you at the table or celebrate anniversaries (the guys in Benihana will sing you an anniversary song in Japanese!). To make the best of it – go in a big group and take over an entire table, but then it is also good fun when you start talking to fellow diners about food and they start recommending things you should eat there. One of the diners at our table to us that he had just recovered from a bad reaction to prawns that landed him in the ICU, so while we encouraged us to binge on sea food (asking us to be careful all along), he played safe with the chicken and lamb. Be rest assured that no matter what you pick from their extensive menu, it is going to be quite perfect. Benihana is a very old name in authentic Teppanyaki grill eatery and they stay true to their legacy. A meal for two comes to Rs 3500 (plus taxes) at the property – head over!last_img read more

Four trans people sue Ohio for banning gender changes on birth certificates

first_imgGAYSTARNEWS- eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Trans father could forever change UK rules on birth certificatesRicky Martin is celebrating trans rights in Puerto RicoQueensland will allow trans people to stay married after they transitionRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/four-trans-people-sue-ohio/ Four trans people are suing Ohio for refusing to allow them to change their birth certificates to match their identity.Ohio is currently one of three states in the US that does not allow changes on birth certificates.The lawsuit filed last week by the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union in the U.S. District Court claims the state’s refusal is an infringement on their constitutional rights.According to NBC News, the lawsuit claimed:‘Ohio’s practice, which each Defendant enforces, violates federal constitutional guarantees, including the rights to equal protection, due process, and freedom from compelled speech.‘There is no government justification to support Ohio’s refusal to provide transgender people with accurate birth certificates matching their gender identity.’Ohio woman denied job because ‘drivers license and birth certificate didn’t match’Stacy Ray one of those filing the lawsuit said she applied for a job with the Transportation Security Administration.But she was denied a background check because the gender on her birth certificate and drivers license didn’t match. TwitterTwitter decided to challenge myths about trans people ‘There are people who don’t want the surgery, can’t afford the surgery so having that requirement sets an unreasonable bar.’‘Only about half the states allow transgender individuals to change the birth marker with an administrative process, and that’s what we are pushing for.’Ohio city gives $34,000 in grants to local LGBT programsMeanwhile, last November, Akron, Ohio recently awarded 13 local LGBT programs $34,000 in grants.The money comes from the Akron Community Foundation’s Gay Community Endowment Fund. They announced the 13 grants at their quarterly meeting on 17 November.Since its foundation in 2001, the program has donated nearly $475,000 to local LGBT programs.The fund takes grant applications ‘for programs and services that positively impact the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community’.Furthermore, it also ‘raises awareness about equality issues and rallies the LGBT community around a common philanthropic purpose’.Paul Daum, a founding member and theater professor at the University of Akron, was dedicated to arts and LGBT youth.‘We’re proud to carry on Paul’s legacy with grants to organizations he cared about during his lifetime,’ said Cindy Christman, Gay Community Endowment Fund chairwoman.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…last_img read more

read more

first_img Related Content November 4, 2009 – “We know it’s less expensive to treat a disease in its early stages, yet CMS’ reimbursement policies continue to undermine the effectiveness of early diagnosis for diseases like breast cancer and heart disease,” Tim Trysla, executive director of the Access to Medical Imaging Coalition (AMIC). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) last week published final regulations that will drastically reduce physician reimbursements for medical imaging services beginning in 2010, resulting in diminished patient access to early detection tests that save lives and money, according to AMIC. The 2010 Physician Fee Schedule released Friday by CMS will reduce payments to non-hospital practices by 48 percent for pelvis CT, by 46 percent for MRI of the chest-spine, and by 27 percent for cardiovascular-related services. Cuts to cardiology services could impact up to two-thirds of cardiovascular patients as practices are forced to shut their doors. “As private practices close, hospital-based practices, which are largely insulated from the Medicare cuts contained in this rule, will not be able to handle the influx of patients. This rule will severely disrupt the delivery of care and patients will suffer,” said Trysla.The Fee Schedule will reduce Medicare payments for imaging performed in non-hospital settings by reducing the values assigned to physicians’ practice expenses based on non-representative practice expense data collected through the AMA’s Physician Practice Information Survey (PPIS) and by drastically increasing the utilization assumption – the amount of time imaging equipment is assumed to operate during the hours a physician’s office or center is open – for advanced diagnostic imaging equipment from 50 percent to 90 percent over the next four years. In a public statement, AMIC wrote: “These changes lead us down a precarious path toward large reimbursement cuts to many critical imaging services, particularly those that employ MRI and CT technology, which are hit both by the practice expense data and the utilization rate change.”It is believed these reimbursement cuts will result in reduced services, closed physician practices, long wait times and limited access for Medicare patients. Many seniors will be denied care, while many more will experience long delays or have to travel long distances to receive important diagnostic tests, which will further delay treatment. Furthermore, the cuts will increase overall patient costs as hospital-based cardiology and clinical and diagnostic services require patients to pay more out of pocket for these services than they would pay for the same care provided in physician offices.AMIC said: “Policymakers need to recognize that reducing reimbursements for advanced imaging has a direct negative impact on the delivery of care. On top of the nearly 20 percent cut to payments for advanced imaging services in 2007, the health reform bills pending before Congress also include billions in reimbursement reductions. The unfortunate result of these policy changes will be greatly reduced access and quality of care for America’s seniors, especially in rural regions of the country.” The Senate health reform legislation would move the utilization rate for CT, MR, PET and nuclear from 50 percent to 65 percent for four years, while the House bill would increase it to 75 percent.“By pegging the utilization rate at 90 percent, CMS is adopting policy that isn’t supported by data,” Trysla said. “While CMS clearly missed the mark with this rule, we are committed to working with the agency to provide informative data regulators can use to determine an accurate and responsible utilization rate. A 90 percent utilization assumption is far from responsible public policy.”For more information: rightscanrighttime.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | November 04, 2009 CMS’ Imaging Cuts Limit Access to Early Detection Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 06, 2019 Canon Medical Introduces Encore Orian MR Upgrade Program Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. is helping to provide low-cost patient care solutions for its customers with the launch… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 05, 2019 Digital Health Devices Used at Point of Care May Improve Diagnostic Certainty A West Virginia-based rural medical outreach event showcased the use of point-of-care technology in an ambulatory… read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more last_img read more

read more

first_img Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Information Technology View all 220 items Recent Videos View all 606 items Find more SCCT news and videos Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Videos | June 29, 2011 Agfa – Impax Data Center Offers EMR Access to Images Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment The Agfa Impax Data Center offers a repository for medical images where they can interface with clinical information systems and document management systems. The system allows Web-based capture, storage exchange and access to high-quality medical images.For more information: www.agfahealthcare.us Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference.center_img Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Hawaiiwide renovations now complete says Marriott Hotels and Autograph Collection

first_img Travelweek Group Share Posted by HAWAII — Marriott International has big news to share: it has completed its multi-million-dollar improvements and renovations across its Marriott Hotels and Autograph Collection Hotels in the Aloha State.At six Marriott Hotels and Autograph Collection Hotels across four Hawaiian Islands, all resort properties have completed improvements in the past 18 months, including room and pool enhancements, transformation of meeting and event spaces, enriched cultural experiences, and the introduction of new and repositioned oceanfront resorts.Here are the renovation highlights:Mauna Kea Beach HotelMauna Kea Beach Hotel, part of Autograph Collection Hotels (Waimea, Hawaii Island): The property unveiled new meeting spaces including the Kauna’oa Ballroom following a $4.5 million renovation. It also debuted the Copper Bar with its team of mixologists.Koloa Landing ResortKoloa Landing Resort at Poipu, part of Autograph Collection Hotels (Koloa, Kauai): In March 2017, the resort became the newest addition to the company’s Hawaii resorts following its multi-year, $110 million expansion. This included a new 12,000 square-foot grand ballroom and two outdoor lawns. The resort also features the newest pool complex in Hawaii, comprised of a new saline lagoon-style pool with swim-through grottos and cabanas, as well as a new poolside bar & grill concept in collaboration with celebrity chef Sam Choy.Waikiki Beach Marriott Resort & Spa (Honolulu, Oahu): The resort’s $22 million transformation in February 2016 included a redesigned lobby and event spaces, as well as a new bourbon bar featuring Waikiki’s only prime rib buffet. This year, the resort will begin redesigning its 1,310 rooms.Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & SpaWaikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa (Waikoloa, Hawaii Island): A multi-million-dollar investment, completed in summer 2017, features a new arrival experience, premium guestrooms and modern interiors. This year, the resort will debut a transformed luxury wing and private open-air showers on the ground floor room lanais. It also recently debuted Aka’ula Lanai, a new espresso bar that transitions to a cocktail lounge at sunset.Kaua’i Marriott Resort – Marriott, Maui (Wailea, Maui): The $100 million reimagined property debuted in December 2016 and now boasts a new arrival experience, five pools with one featuring Hawaii’s longest waterslide, Kid’s club, multi-generational GameSpace, Movie House, Escape Room, and redesigned rooms and suites, along with the total modernization of all indoor/outdoor meeting and event spaces.Improvements across the collection meet the demand for travel to the 50th state as Hawaii continues to be a sought after destination for leisure and group travel. According to the Hawaii Tourism Authority, the state has seen a fifth consecutive year of record growth in visitor arrivals and visitor spending. In addition, increased airlift from the mainland in 2017 and beyond from major airline carriers means greater accessibility to the islands. Marriott’s Hawaii Resorts continues this trajectory of growth as it prepares for a further increase in tourism to the state. Tuesday, February 27, 2018 center_img Hawaii-wide renovations now complete, says Marriott Hotels and Autograph Collection Tags: Hawaii, Openings & Renovations << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Madagascar sets date for next years vote

first_img Comments   Share   More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements Top Stories Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar (AP) – Madagascar’s election commission says the island nation plans to hold its presidential election next year on May 8.Election commission president Beatrice Attalah said Wednesday that the country will hold a run-off on July 3, 2013, as well as elections for the National Assembly the same day. Attalah said elections for municipal posts will be held Oct. 23, 2013.The announcement comes while Madagascar’s exiled president Marc Ravalomanana remains unable to return home. Rival Andry Rajoelina toppled Ravalomanana in 2009 and now leads a unity government charged with preparing for next year’s elections. Ravalomanana and Rajoelina held talks in recent days in the Seychelles about allowing the exiled president to return. However, officials in Madagascar deported Ravalomanana’s wife to Thailand when she recently flew into the country with a relative.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) 4 must play golf courses in Arizonacenter_img 5 things to look for when selecting an ophthalmologist Sponsored Stories The vital role family plays in society Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debates New high school in Mesa lets students pick career pathslast_img read more

Papadopoulos appoints advisor who proposed ditching the euro Update

first_imgThe recruitment by presidential candidate Nicholas Papadopoulos of economist Stelios Platis, who six years ago parted ways with President Nicos Anastasiades and tabled the idea of leaving the euro in 2013, has exposed the Diko chairman to criticism from ruling Disy.Platis, who on Thursday criticised the Anastasiades government over its handling of the fiscal and banking crisis in March 2013, the subsequent economic contraction, and the increase of unemployment, said that he felt insulted for being called a proponent of returning the the pound.“These are lies,” he said in an interview with state radio CyBC on Friday, in reference to a statement issued by Disy the previous day criticising him for proposing looking for solutions that did not include the troika of international lenders four years ago.“They suggest that I have taken a specific position by proposing Cyprus’ exit from the euro area which I have never proposed,” Platis said. “This is not a way to do politics”.Cyprus adopted the euro in 2008 when Papadopoulos’s father Tassos Papadopoulos was president.Disy said Platis had suggested leaving the euro and had rejected the first Eurogroup decision in March 2013, which provided for a special levy on deposits, 6.6 per cent on those below €100,000, and 9.9 per cent on those in excess of that amount.As a result of the subsequent rejection of that proposal, Cyprus had to seek a bailout based on terms which included the winding down of Laiki Bank, resulting in the loss of uninsured deposits. Bank of Cyprus, which absorbed Laiki’s operations, was asked to convert almost half of uninsured deposits into equity.According to several videos available on Youtube, Platis proposed seeking solutions “outside” the constraints of the troika of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the European Commission and the European Central Bank which supervised and funded bailouts in the euro area.In one video, dated April 2, 2013, Platis said in an interview to Mega TV that he proposed inter alia “practical analysis and preparation for our exit from the euro area”.“It may not be our decision,” he said. “The decision for us to leave the euro area may not be ours; it may be taken by Germany, something we don’t know. The Eurogroup decisions refer to a possibility that they have decided the euro area would have to operate differently from now on.”Days later, in a speech at the Thucydides Think Tank, the economist who had advised Anastasiades when he was leader of Disy, said there were pros and cons in “seeking solutions without the troika”.In that case, the government could resort to financing from deposits by compensating depositors with bonds, he said, as after all, “in five years’ time, the euro may not even exist”.In another case, he also suggested that “all the country’s available wealth,” should serve as collateral to guarantee deposits and described the first Eurogroup proposal as “equally disastrous” as an exit from the euro area.Disy, who placed Platis on its ballot in the 2011 parliament elections, also accused him of representing Akel at “official meetings,” which back also openly favoured a return to the Cyprus pound.Akel’s lawmaker Stefanos Stefanou denied this saying that Stavros Evagorou represented the communist party in those meetings.Finance Minister Harris Georgiades dismissed the Limassol-based economist’s criticism of the government’s handling of the crisis, suggesting it was triggered by personal motives.Georgiades, who was commenting in an emailed statement, said that Platis “no matter how hard he may try, he cannot undo the fact that responsible decisions, the decisive contribution of productive forces and the middle class. helped create again a prospect and hope”.“No personal ambition should compromise this course of recovery,” Georgiades said. Appointed by Anastasiades in April 2013, Georgiades is credited with overseeing the consolidation of public finances and the restoration of market access.A spokesperson for the Papadopoulos campaign said Platis never proposed ditching the euro and referred to Platis to elaborate on his positions four years ago.“What I proposed was to practically prepare for the event they threw us out against our will,” Platis said on Friday. “Is this a proposal to leave the euro?”On Thursday, Platis said that as a result of the “haircut” on deposits, the economy lost 9.8 per cent of its nominal output, roughly €1.9bn, adding that recent growth will not help recover lost ground.Cystat date does not support this allegation. Cyprus’s economic output contracted 6.9 per cent in nominal terms in 2013 to €18.1bn and 6 per cent in real terms, which is the actual metric used to measure economicHe also criticised the current labour market situation suggesting that the recent drop in unemployment was the product of emigration, a claim partially supported by Cystat data.While the number of Cypriot gainfully employed dropped by 5,204 in 2016 compared to 2012, the drop was steeper among foreign EU citizens and third country nationals whose number dropped by 8,797 and 8,166 respectively, mainly on a reduction in the number of housemaids and construction workers.You May LikePopularEverythingColorado Mom Adopted Two Children, Months Later She Learned Who They Really ArePopularEverythingUndoUltimate Pet Nutrition Nutra Thrive SupplementAdd This One Thing To Your Dog’s Food To Help Them Be HealthierUltimate Pet Nutrition Nutra Thrive SupplementUndoGundry MDHow To Make Your Dark Spots Fade (Effortless 2 Minute Routine)Gundry MDUndo Concern over falling tourism numbersUndoTurkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoOur View: Argaka mukhtar should not act as if he owns the beachUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

Troika hear concerns of construction sector

first_imgBy Angelos AnastasiouDelegates from the troika’s Cyprus mission resumed their meetings with various government officials and other stakeholders on Wednesday, day two of the representation’s fourth review of Cyprus’ adjustment programme.Wednesday’s schedule included a 2 pm meeting with federation of building contractors OSEOK, who laid out the critical challenges faced by the construction sector. A key driver of economic growth over the previous decade, the construction industry suffered a serious hit over the last five years, with a reported contraction of 40 per cent in the last year. Sector leaders have variously made dramatic calls to the government, asking it to take measures in support of the struggling industry.After the meeting, OSEOK chairman Kostas Roushias said that the construction industry employs 28,000, down from over 40,000 in previous years.He expressed the need for growth incentives in the construction sector and the absorption of European funds.“There can be no growth without incentives, like a temporary reduction in the VAT rate to 5 per cent for transactions relating to construction projects and the reduction of capital gains taxation,” he said.Roushias also reported that one in five businesses in the construction industry had suspended its operations, and reiterated his view on the need for the creation of the post of Deputy Minister for Economic Growth.Later on Wednesday, the troika delegates saw the management of the Bank of Cyprus. The 3 pm session revolved around the burning issue of non-performing loans (NPLs), which threatens the bank’s prospects and has garnered talk of creating a ‘bad’ bank which would buy up the lender’s toxic assets at a discount, thus taking some of the pressure off the BoC’s balance sheet. The move, however, has stalled in search of the necessary funds to purchase the assets.The issue of NPLs dominated the troika delegation’s meeting with bank employees’ union ETYK, with the union defending its members’ sacrifices and focusing on the need for employers to repay their loans so that banks can return to health.Speaking after the meeting, ETYK’s vice president Christos Charalambous said the troika had been briefed on the 40 per cent cuts on banks’ payrolls, bonus payments and the need to repay NPLs.Charalambous said that the union had asked the banks to impose a three-year moratorium on bonuses but was snubbed on the grounds of this being an exclusive management decision. He argued that salary slashes reached 50 per cent at the Bank of Cyprus and roughly 45 per cent in other banks, “the sacrifices that needed to be made by bank employees have been made, and now management is expected to act decisively in collecting non-performing loans.”Charalambous also attacked employers’ association OEV and said that employers need to start repaying their loans in order to help the banks return to normalcy.“At last, OEV must pressure its members into paying their NPLs, instead of pressuring ordinary citizens into repaying their loans,” he said. “The largest amounts are owed by OEV members, and that is why the effort should focus on OEV.”The delegation started its review on Tuesday with a focus on economic issues – NPLs topping the list as the hottest item on the agenda – as well as health issues, where implementation of the long-delayed National Health Scheme (NHS) has become an imperative for the troika. Monday’s kick-off review meeting with Health Minister Philippos Patsalis was rumoured to have produced moderate results as the Ministry’s roadmap to implementation of the NHS – submitted last Friday – left the troika unconvinced as the level of detail on some key points was deemed weak. As confirmed by official stakeholders, additional meetings with the Health Ministry have been scheduled for further deliberations on the issue.On Thursday, a troika delegation will meet with Labour Minister Zeta Emilianidou regarding the issue of the Minimum Guaranteed Income policy, the introduction of which is part of Cyprus’ adjustment programme obligations.According to Emilianidou, Thursday’s meeting has been scheduled for 2pm.This week’s troika meetings focus on the technocratic level, while next week will see political consultations and negotiations in order to finalise the revised Memorandum of Understanding.You May LikeLivestlyChip And Joanna’s $18M Mansion Is Perfect, But It’s The Backyard Everyone Is Talking AboutLivestlyUndoPopularEverythingColorado Mom Adopted Two Children, Months Later She Learned Who They Really ArePopularEverythingUndoSenior Living | Search AdsCheap Senior Apartments in Rowland Heights Are Turning HeadsSenior Living | Search AdsUndo Pensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoCruise passenger airlifted to Paphos hospitalUndoRemand for pair in alleged property fraud (Updated)Undoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more